Dispelling the bogey of dispensability: evidencing the value of architects [BOOK REVIEW]

  Listenback is always hungry for evidence to improve its underlying rationale. Our last blog mentioned a new book that falls into this category, and it’s fascinating. Here’s our review… Why Architects Matter: Evidencing and Communicating the Value of Architects is a polemic calling for architects to buck up their ideas. Written by architect and …

Turbo-charged business development: most architects are missing a trick

  The Listenback system of feedback takes the well-established business development model and turbo-charges it for growth. With minimum disruption and very little extra resource, it exploits opportunities along the client journey, allowing you to learn where value can be added to improve the overall client experience. At its heart is a simple feedback tool …

Relaying quality in the construction industry: context and process

  Not all buildings have to be capital A Architecture or turn a capital P Profit. After all, sometimes it makes perfect sense to build something imperfectly and at a financial loss, provided your reasons are strong enough. It’s all about the context: industrial sheds, for example, need not be anything other than safe and …

Effortlessness – not delight – drives profitable client relationships

The Listenback system of client feedback is all about architects collecting data that can be used to increase the chances of repeat business, bigger spends, and positive referrals. This is known as improving client loyalty, and it’s the way to a thriving practice. The received wisdom in business generally is that to win this loyalty …

Client experience: the simple business development metric for architects

  If your work pipeline is flowing, and you’re earning a fair profit from it, and some clients keep coming back, it’s tempting to think that you’ve cracked the code to business success. And you have, up to a point. But business development is a never-ending responsibility. Even if you’re not going for world domination, …

Embrace change: the secret to better client relationships

Evidence suggests that the relationship between architects and their clients is not consistently respectful. As mutual misunderstanding hardens into unreasonable positions, tensions are rising. In some quarters, the ominous and unhelpful sound of axes being ground can be heard. Since they stand to suffer more in any fight and as the professional party, the onus …

Face up to client feedback: pin back your ears, bite your tongue, and learn

  The biggest obstacle to asking for client feedback is fear. It forces you to confront your insecurities and guilty secrets, and that is terrifying. No doubt about it, inviting criticism is hard. Your brain reels in alarm. What if your clients realize that you’re winging it?  What if their other architects are able to …